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Although we knew that GDP could be built for the Renesas R-Car Gen 3 Salvator-X(S) boards they were not supported in the GDP init mechanism that sets up GDP for you. You typically asked GDP init to setup for one of the R-Car Starter Kit boards and manually made the changes to build for Salvator-X.

Between Gunnar and I we have now added Salvator-X(S) support directly into the init mechanism on the GDP master, 14.0.x-rocko and 14.1.x-sumo branches.


To initiate the build environment for M3 Salvator-X(S) use the command:

source init.sh r-car-m3-salvator-x


To initiate the build environment for H3 Salvator-X(S) use the command:

source init.sh r-car-h3-salvator-x


I have successfully tested the mechanism on M3 Salvator-X and H3 Salvator-XS.

With the recent release of meta-ivi v14.50.x and GDP v14.1 the Genivi platforms were re-based on Yocto Project 2.5 (Sumo). It's therefore a good time to write a blog about support for them on Renesas R-Car Gen 3.

R-Car Gen 3 Community Yocto BSP v3.9.0 for YP 2.5 (Sumo)

Back in August I blogged about the customer Yocto BSP v3.9.0 for YP 2.4 (Rocko). The customer BSP typically updates Yocto Project once a year. To help support the community Renesas is re-basing these releases on Sumo to create a community Yocto BSP.

Developer Summary

PurposeRepository locationBranch
Upstream Community Yocto BSP supporthttps://github.com/renesas-rcar/meta-renesas.gitsumo-dev

Adapt Yocto BSP (meta-renesas) to Genivi Yocto Baseline (meta-ivi)

https://github.com/GENIVI/meta-ivi-renesas.gitgenivi-14.x-sumo

Migration Guide

If you wish to use the "click through" licensed gfx/mmp packages that requires no NDA then please download the packages for YBSP v3.9.0 and Wayland 1.14 / Weston 3.0 from the section for YP 2.5 (Sumo) from here.

If you are updating from an earlier BSP version then the new Yocto BSP release introduces updates to various Yocto BSP packages including the kernel, Initial Program Loader (IPL) and u-boot. The kernel and op-tee updates include mitigations for Spectre/Meltdown.

Please flash the updated IPL/u-boot to your board. Instructions for doing that can be found on elinux.org in the "Flashing Firmware" section of the M3 Starter Kit and H3 Starter Kit board pages. For Salvator-X(S) and Ebisu boards please refer to the documentation that came with the customer Yocto BSP.

There has been no change to the example local.confs.

Details of the Yocto BSP changes can be found in the git commit messages. Here is a log between v3.9.0 (Rocko) and v3.9.0 (Sumo) using the github compare function.

The community v.3.9.0 (Sumo) BSP uses the upstream (Poky) Weston 3.0 implementation and therefore only supports the gl-renderer which uses the GPU for h/w acceleration.

The dtb filenames have not changed since the last blog but here is the table again for reference. Please refer to the table below for the correct dtb to use for your board and SoC:

BoardSoCDTB filename
EbisuE3Image-r8a77990-ebisu.dtb
M3 Starter KitM3

Image-r8a7796-m3ulcb.dtb

Salvator-XM3Image-r8a7796-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XSM3Image-r8a7796-salvator-xs.dtb
Salvator-XM3N 1.1Image-r8a77965-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XSM3N 1.1Image-r8a77965-salvator-xs.dtb
H3 Starter KitH3 1.0, 1.1Image-r8a7795-es1-h3ulcb.dtb
H3 Starter KitH3 2.0Image-r8a7795-h3ulcb.dtb
Salvator-XH3 1.0, 1.1Image-r8a7795-es1-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XH3 2.0Image-r8a7795-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XS 4GByteH3 2.0, 3.0Image-r8a7795-salvator-xs.dtb
Salvator-XS 8GByteH3 3.0Image-r8a7795-salvator-xs-4x2gb.dtb

Documentation

I continue to maintain pages discussing the building of Genivi s/w for R-Car in the meta-ivi Yocto BSP wiki area. I have created a new page covering R-Car Gen 3 builds for Genivi-14 (Pulsar) for YP 2.5 (Sumo).

Genivi Yocto Baseline

I have successfully sanity tested building the 14.50.x Genivi Yocto Baseline using the Community YBSP v3.9.0 for Sumo on the M3 and H3 Starter Kits. Testing of the other boards will follow, but I do not expect any issues and see no reason for you to wait before trying them.

See the Documentation section above on how to build it.

GDP

The GDP Master and 14.1.x-sumo branches have been updated to use the Community Yocto BSP v3.9.0 for Sumo. I have also updated the corresponding build instructions of the GDP Master wiki page. Finally, I have successfully sanity tested it on the M3 and H3 Starter Kits. As with the Baseline testing of the other boards will follow.

Some of you may have noticed that the upstream Renesas R-Car Gen 3 Yocto BSP was updated to v3.9.0. With updates to the GDP and Genivi wiki complete, along with initial sanity testing its time for a blog to pull the threads together. So, this blog discusses using it with Genivi-14, the Genivi Yocto Baseline and GDP.

R-Car Gen 3 Yocto BSP v3.9.0

Developer Summary

PurposeRepository LocationBranch
Upstream Yocto BSP supporthttps://github.com/renesas-rcar/meta-renesas.gitrocko

Adapt Yocto BSP (meta-renesas) to Genivi Yocto Baseline (meta-ivi)

https://github.com/GENIVI/meta-ivi-renesas.gitgenivi-14.x

Migration Guide

If you wish to use the "click through" licensed gfx/mmp packages that requires no NDA then please download the packages for Yocto v3.9.0 and Wayland 1.13 /Weston 2.0 from here.

The new Yocto BSP release introduces updates to various Yocto BSP packages including the kernel, Initial Program Loader (IPL) and u-boot. The kernel and op-tee updates include mitigations for Spectre/Meltdown.

Please flash the updated IPL/u-boot to your board. Instructions for doing that can be found on elinux.org in the "Flashing Firmware" section of the M3 Starter Kit and H3 Starter Kit board pages. For Salvator-X(S) and Ebisu boards please refer to the documentation that came with the customer Yocto BSP.

There has been no change to the example local.confs and no updates to meta-ivi-renesas were required.

Details of the Yocto BSP changes can be found in the git commit messages. Here is a log since v3.7.0 using the github compare function.

Please refer to the table below for the correct dtb to use for your board and SoC:

BoardSoCDTB filename
EbisuE3Image-r8a77990-ebisu.dtb
M3 Starter KitM3

Image-r8a7796-m3ulcb.dtb

Salvator-XM3Image-r8a7796-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XSM3Image-r8a7796-salvator-xs.dtb
Salvator-XM3N 1.1Image-r8a77965-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XSM3N 1.1Image-r8a77965-salvator-xs.dtb
H3 Starter KitH3 1.0, 1.1Image-r8a7795-es1-h3ulcb.dtb
H3 Starter KitH3 2.0Image-r8a7795-h3ulcb.dtb
Salvator-XH3 1.0, 1.1Image-r8a7795-es1-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XH3 2.0Image-r8a7795-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XS 4GByteH3 2.0, 3.0Image-r8a7795-salvator-xs.dtb
Salvator-XS 8GByteH3 3.0Image-r8a7795-salvator-xs-4x2gb.dtb

You can find the migration guide for v3.7.0 and links to earlier releases in my v3.7.0 blog.

Documentation

Historically I have maintained pages discussing the building of Genivi s/w for R-Car in the meta-ivi Yocto BSP wiki area. I have updated the page covering R-Car Gen 3 builds for Genivi-14 to use YBSP v3.9.0.

Genivi Yocto Baseline

I have successfully sanity tested building the 14.0.0 (P-1.0) Genivi Yocto Baseline using Yocto BSP v3.9.0 on the M3 Starter Kit.

See the Documentation section above on how to build it.

GDP

The GDP Master branch has been updated (pull request) to use Yocto BSP v3.9.0. I have also updated the corresponding build instructions of the GDP Master wiki page. Finally, I have successfully sanity tested it on the M3 Starter Kit.

In my earlier blogs I discussed the initial Genivi-14 support using Yocto BSP v3.4.0 and a subsequent update to v3.6.0.

Upstream has updated to Yocto BSP v3.7.0 and this blog discusses using it with Genivi-14, the Genivi Yocto Baseline and GDP.

R-Car Gen 3 Yocto BSP v3.7.0

Developer Summary

PurposeRepository LocationBranch
Upstream Yocto BSP supporthttps://github.com/renesas-rcar/meta-renesas.gitrocko

Adapt Yocto BSP (meta-renesas) to Genivi Yocto Baseline (meta-ivi)

https://github.com/GENIVI/meta-ivi-renesas.gitgenivi-14.x

Migration Guide

if you wish to use the "click through" licensed gfx/mmp packages that requires no NDA then please download the packages for Yocto v3.7.0 and Wayland 1.13 /Weston 2.0 from here.

The new Yocto BSP release introduces updates to various Yocto BSP packages including the kernel, Initial Program Loader (IPL) and u-boot.

Yocto BSP v3.7.0 introduces a new variable H3_OPTION to local.conf to control the SiP DDR configuration chosen when building the IPL/u-boot for Salvator-XS. See the example local.conf in the Yocto BSP for details. For the H3 Starter Kit the correct setting is chosen for you.

Please flash the updated IPL/u-boot to your board. Instructions for doing that can be found on elinux.org in the "Flashing Firmware" section of the M3 Starter Kit and H3 Starter Kit board pages. For Salvator-X(S) and Ebisu boards please refer to the documentation that came with the customer Yocto BSP.

Details of the Yocto BSP changes can be found in the git commit messages. Here is a log using the github compare function.

Please refer to the table below for the correct dtb to use for your board and SoC:

BoardSoCDTB filename
EbisuE3Image-r8a77990-ebisu.dtb
M3 Starter KitM3

Image-r8a7796-m3ulcb.dtb

Salvator-XM3Image-r8a7796-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XSM3Image-r8a7796-salvator-xs.dtb
Salvator-XM3N 1.1Image-r8a77965-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XSM3N 1.1Image-r8a77965-salvator-xs.dtb
H3 Starter KitH3 1.0, 1.1Image-r8a7795-es1-h3ulcb.dtb
H3 Starter KitH3 2.0Image-r8a7795-h3ulcb.dtb
Salvator-XH3 1.0, 1.1Image-r8a7795-es1-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XH3 2.0Image-r8a7795-salvator-x.dtb
Salvator-XS 4GByteH3 2.0, 3.0Image-r8a7795-salvator-xs.dtb
Salvator-XS 8GByteH3 3.0Image-r8a7795-salvator-xs-4x2gb.dtb


Documentation

Historically I have maintained pages discussing the building of Genivi s/w for R-Car in the meta-ivi Yocto BSP wiki area. I have updated the page covering R-Car Gen 3 builds for Genivi-14 to use YBSP v3.7.0.

Genivi Yocto Baseline

I have successfully sanity tested building the 14.0.0 (P-1.0) Genivi Yocto Baseline using Yocto BSP v3.7.0 on the M3 Starter Kit.

See the Documentation section above on how to build it.

GDP

Rebasing of GDP on the Genivi-14 Yocto Baseline is well underway. The various pull requests mentioned in the earlier blogs have been merged into a GDP working branch called rocko. My pull request to update the branch to use Yocto BSP v3.7.0 has been merged. I have successfully sanity tested building the branch on the M3 Starter Kit.



A new addition from Renesas is coming into GENIVI's Development Platform (GDP): genivi-dev-platform/pull/62 repository 

It's always exciting to see new hardware be supported by the GDP and this addition is no exception. The platform this time is the Renesas Gen 3 which is a high-end System on a Chip (SoC) designed with autonomous driving in mind. I'm sure we'll see more information on this once the code for this is merged into the GDP but for now if you're eager you can follow along at GitHub as it gets merged.

News from FOSDEM

The most recent FOSDEM conference is over and I hope to review some presentations done there for those who couldn't make it. Lots of GENIVI members were there, both presenting and participating in various meetings. I hope to bring everyone up to date with a series of blog posts so without further ado I'm going to start by blogging my recent article for the GENIVI Newsletter below.

GENIVI Bridging the Automotive Industry and Open Source at FOSDEM

GENIVI members were widely represented at FOSDEM this year and while there were fewer pure automotive talks this year, there was still a great deal of discussion on automotive open source from GENIVI members and the open source community.

Of note were a number of talks that clearly show in what direction our community is headed. That direction is broadly called “upwards” on the stack toward a more connected car and “downwards” toward the Linux kernel. GENIVI, of course, is focused on commodity middleware in the head unit, but there is a lot of open source work in automotive being done in the Linux kernel and on the network side in the cloud that connects to the GENIVI middleware.

GENIVI’s GDP team lead, Zeeshan Ali, presented Creating the open connected car with GENIVI (https://fosdem.org/2017/schedule/event/openconnectedcar/) in the embedded devroom. Many sessions in this devroom attracted a full house at FOSDEM and the GENIVI GDP talk was no exception. Zeeshan went through a little history of GENIVI then spoke about various GENIVI components coming into the GDP and went a bit deeper into several of them. GENIVI’s spins were mentioned as were the Google Summer of Code proposals, the Smart City pilot project as well as a call for volunteers made to the wider open source community. Right after the GDP talk, Konsulko’s Leon Anavi held a talk on creating hardware for the Raspberry Pi board-- it was also very popular and well done. A number of other highly relevant talks were covered in the embedded devroom:

 


The first of these talks was astonishing. The people at PolySync reverse engineered CAN signals to enable control by wire functionality on a name brand car. They created an automated system to control the throttle, brakes and steering. All of this was done with as much “off the shelf” hardware and software as possible and when they couldn’t find hardware to fit their needs they created it. GENIVI member PolySync is a startup that wants to build up an ecosystem around these technologies and by the looks of it they’ve had some success so far. One of the big takeaways from the talk was not how a company like this might disrupt the relationship between automotive OEMs and their suppliers, but how easy it is to reverse engineer automotive protocols and how quickly and cheaply the work can be done. The automotive design and development process is laborious, but it is that way for a reason. Those reasons, i.e., quality, safety, robustness, are unlikely to disappear anytime soon, but
it’s clear that there are ambitious attempts out there to do “permissionless innovation” around the CAN network as well as other control systems in modern vehicles, and not just using software.

Lukas Bulwahn’s talk was very enlightening. It provided a look at future plans around Adaptive AUTOSAR and CommonAPI and what direction they plan to take. It also spoke about a distinction between “control” and “cognitive” software and how traditional automotive software development is changing into a new paradigm that incorporates more powerful SoCs, artificial intelligence, and a more dynamic software structure. Many will find the paper (http://www.bmw-carit.com/downloads/publications/ResearchOnAnOpenSourceSoftwarePlatformForAutonomousDrivingSystems.pdf) that was the basis of this talk interesting reading.

Lastly, the talk by Nicholas McGuire and an additional talk by another Open Source Automation Development Lab member on statistical quality measurements in Linux provided a good overview of the discoveries from the process of preparing Linux for functional safety certification. This is a hot topic among OEMs and other GENIVI members as they look to take advantage of the significantly greater power that modern silicon offers them in the vehicle overall.

From Zeeshan’s talk which spoke about the open connected car to the talks from BMW and Open Source Automation Development Lab, we can see that interest in open source and in GENIVI components is growing to embrace the cloud and the cluster. It feels like GENIVI members are pushing open source automotive software in both directions.

I hope to do a series of post on notable recent contributions, this is the first. I wanted to highlight a couple of recent developments to Persistence and to the integration of a browser into GENIVI based on the Chromium project which is Google's open source browser project. Persistent data is data that rests on the head unit between reboots and is a key mechanism in bringing personalization to the car since with this data you can create personalized playlists, settings and other in-vehicle experiences. The underlying mechanism to store data on the car in between use is not particularly glamorous, it's clearly the kind of non-differentiating software that every car needs if it wants to enable any personalization at all. This is why its good to see feedback on the GENIVI Persistence software from production projects, it brings a certain validation to the GENIVI design. Recent contributions from Delphi are worth highlighting here for their diligence and detail.

Chromium

You surely have heard of Google's Chrome browser, but have you heard that their Chromium project is an open source project developing, amongst other things, the Chromium Embedded Framework (CEF)? This is an exciting project since it brings "the infrastructure developers need to quickly add HTML rendering and JavaScript" functionality to the GENIVI Development Platform. This will allow GENIVI to do things like access lower level libraries and data via an app-like approach. After all, many "apps" are just HTML and JavaScript. With the addition of the CEF one will be able to also access APIs from the W3C for example and there is interesting contribution there from JLR and Volksvagen. If you want to follow the development as CEF makes its way into the GDP, you might look here: meta-genivi-dev/pull/53 repository

Important discussion on the project is also at Igalia's blog. Stay tuned here and in GENIVI's newsletter for more!

You may have noticed that Renesas has been rolling out a new third generation of R-Car SoCs starting with the H3 and M3 SoCs. Targeted at the Automotive Cockpit they form a part of the wider Renesas Automotive Product family.

As with the previous generations Renesas intends to support their use in Genivi platforms and to actively participate in Genivi itself. This includes maintaining a git repository containing a Yocto BSP with the changes required for the standard Yocto BSP to work with the Genivi Yocto Baseline (GYB) and Genivi Development Platform (GDP) already integrated.

Genivi 10

The first R-Car Gen 3 Yocto BSPs used YP 2.0 (Jethro) and s/w versions matched the requirements of Genivi 10. Therefore as a first step we have developed GYB and GDP support for both the Salvator-X Evaluation boards and M3 Starter Kit low cost board.

Genivi Yocto Baseline

Details of where to find the Genivi Yocto BSP for the boards and combine it with the Genivi Yocto Baseline can be found in the GYB section of the Renesas wiki page for Genivi 10.

GDP10

GDP10 was developed by the GDP team but never formally released. Updates are not accepted by the GDP Maintainers so as a service to the community we have integrated both Salvator-X and M3 Starter Kit support for GDP10 into our github.

Genivi 11

We are currently integrating Genivi 11 support and plan to release GDP-11 and GYB support in early February.

 

 

I blogged back in September of last year about R-Car Gen 2 Beta support for Genivi 11.

That support has been stable for several months. I have therefore merged the existing WIP (work in process) branch stevel/genivi-11-wip into a new product branch genivi-11-bsp-1.10.0. This new branch will be used for any future maintenance and has been set as the new default branch in github [1].

There are no other changes, i.e. no new commit to either branch.

[1] https://github.com/slawr/meta-renesas/tree/genivi-11-bsp-1.10.0

The full release of GDP 11 is now available and can be found here. Since the October AMM, GDP 11 has undergone extensive testing to confirm stability and is proven on additional hardware targets. Like the previous release candidate, GDP 11 includes a GENIVI-branded GUI and configurable application launcher, an enriched Software Development Environment (including SDK) and increased vehicle connectivity with Remote Vehicle Interaction Core and SOTA Client software. 

GDP 11 highlights include:

  • Easier to install, build and use
  • Compatible with several Intel and ARM based development boards including the low-cost Raspberry Pi boards
  • Developed in an open and collaborative environment, following the best practices of any reputed FOSS community
  • Combines the latest stable Open Source automotive software components with the latest stable generic Linux based software provided by the Yocto project

Those with Yocto knowledge can build this release from scratch using the GDP 11 build instructions. Other links of interest are:

  • GDP 11 Feature Page provides details on what is new in this release.
  • GDP Releases wiki page where you can find information on how to run the available GDP 11 ports to differentboards. This is of interest to those application developers who are not familiar with Yocto.
  • GDP Master wiki page, with instructions on how to build GDP from scratch with support to a wider range of target boards with Yocto knowledge.
  • GDP 11 Bug Tracking system for those wishing to provide feedback in the form of bug reports, new feature requests, and any other comments on this release. GENIVI welcomes all type of inputs from the community so we can make future GDP releases better.
  • GDP Roadmap for information on the upcoming GDP releases.

The GENIVI community welcomes all member and open source community efforts to further enhance the GDP making it a fully featured and continuously enhanced development platform product. Additionally, GENIVI appreciates assistance in the areas of testing, bug reporting, patching and new feature requesting to advance GDP development (technical discussions occurring on genivi-projects email list and on Jira trackers).

Release notes courtesy of Traci Renner.

Delivered and enhanced by the GENIVI community, the GENIVI Development Platform (GDP) has progressed significantly moving from a demonstrator to a true development platform with the new GDP 11 Release Candidate 3 (RC3) . Like the previous release candidate, GDP 11 RC2, the GDP 11 RC3 includes a number of new features including an enhanced user experience with a GENIVI-branded GUI and configurable application launcher. Also included in GDP 11 RC3 is an enriched Software Development Environment (including SDE) and increased vehicle connectivity with Remote Vehicle Interaction Core and SOTA Client software. All of these new features will be highlighted at the October All Member Meeting (AMM). Additionally, the GDP 11 RC3 containing this new user experience will receive further testing to gain the stability needed for a full release after the AMM.

 

GDP 11 RC3 highlights include:

  • Easier to install, build and use

  • Successful deployment on the low-cost Raspberry Pi boards

  • Developed in an open and collaborative environment, following the best practices of any reputed FOSS community

  • Combines the new UI and application launcher with the latest stable Open Source automotive software components and the latest stable generic Linux based software provided by the Yocto project

  • Consistent with v. 11 of the GENIVI Platform Compliance Specification and its related Baseline

 

GENIVI has provided two release candidates for prospective adopters who may have different goals. GDP 11 RC2 gives adopters a more stable experience given the weeks of testing on multiple hardware boards, though without the new UI and application launcher. GDP 11 RC3 gives adopters the absolute latest set of features including the new UI and application launcher, though the stability of this candidate is still being proven.

 

Those with Yocto knowledge can build this release candidate from scratch from the GDP Master, where work is currently being done to support multiple Intel and ARM-based development boards. Other links of interest are:

  • GDP 11 RC3 Feature Page provides details on what is new in this pre-release.

  • GDP Releases wiki page where you can find information on how to run the available GDP 11 RC2, RC3 ports to different boards and the new SDE . This is of interest to those application developers who are not familiar with Yocto.

  • GDP Master wiki page, with instructions on how to build GDP from scratch with support to a wider range of target boards with Yocto knowledge.

  • GDP 11 Bug Tracking system for those wishing to provide feedback on this release. The GDP Delivery Team welcomes bug reports.

  • GDP 11 Roadmap for information on the upcoming GDP 11 release.

 

The GENIVI community welcomes all member and open source community efforts to further enhance the GDP making it a fully featured and continuously enhanced development platform product. Additionally, GENIVI appreciates assistance in the areas of testing, bug reporting and patching to advance GDP development.

GENIVI Marketing Team

A useful tool when developing an Automotive Infotainment is a screen to view the User Interface. Recently work has been done to support the official Raspberry Pi 2 7" touch screen, as seen here: raspberry-pi-7-touchscreen-display.

If you build automotive infotainment systems, you know that the integration of hardware and software is a key differentiation. In building the GDP we don't have the resources for custom designed hardware so instead we use COTS or common off the shelf technologies. In fact the GDP supports a number of peripherals almost entirely by contributors.

The RPi touchscreen has required a bit of work to get it to work with the GDP, namely drivers in the RPi. Leon Anavi as well as GDP maintainers worked to bring in the needed software and configuration which inevitably led to upstream. Once an open source driver was brought into Linux mainline, the next step has been ensuring that the Graphical tools used by GENIVI, namely Wayland and the Wayland IVI Extension, work on the screen.

While continued discussion is happening on using the screen with GDP 11, it should be ready for everyday use with both the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. Use the links I've provided to follow along with the collaboration with many parts of our community as we continue to support widely available and popular hardware running the GDP.

The GENIVI Alliance is publishing a new release candidate, GDP 11 RC2, to improve the stability of the GENIVI Development Platform (GDP) base system while increasing the number of boards on which the GDP is available. The GDP 11 RC2 includes a number of bug fixes, improvements across the system and more stable ports to several development boards. GENIVI has decided to delay the full GDP 11 release to allow for the addition of a significant feature enhancement in the form of a new user interface and application launcher.

In order to enhance the user experience and to ease adding new applications to the GDP, the GENIVI Graphics Team has provided a brand new user experience which is being integrated into the GDP RC2. This significant feature enhancement will be highlighted at the upcoming GENIVI All Member Meeting (AMM) and will include a GENIVI-branded GUI and configurable application launcher. The updated GDP containing this new user experience will receive additional testing to gain the stability needed for a full release after the AMM.

 GDP RC2 includes the latest bug fixes from meta-ivi along with a variety of other bug fixes and small improvements across the system with more stable ports to the development boards listed below. There is also a port to QEMU for those who want to take a quick look at what GDP base system is today.

  • Intel Minnowboard MAX

  • Raspberry Pi2 and 3

  • Qualcomm Dragonboard 410c

Those with Yocto knowledge can build this second release candidate from scratch from the GDP Master, where Renesas Porter and Silk are also supported. Other links of interest are:

  • GDP 11 RC2 Feature Page provides details on what is new in this pre-release.

  • GDP Releases wiki page where you can find information on how to run the available GDP 11 RC2 ports to different boards. This is of interest to those application developers who are not familiar with Yocto.

  • GDP Master wiki page, with instructions on how to build GDP from scratch with support to a wider range of target boards with Yocto knowledge.

  • GDP 11 Bug Tracking system for those wishing to provide feedback on this release. The GDP Delivery Team welcomes bug reports.

  • GDP Roadmap for information on the upcoming GDP 11 release.

The GENIVI Alliance appreciates all member and community efforts testing the GDP 11 RC2 and will soon announce a final release candidate with the new user interface for testing.

Developer summary

I recently pushed Genivi 11 support for the Renesas R-Car Gen 2 boards to github.

URL: https://github.com/slawr/meta-renesas.git

branch: genivi-11-wip

The branch is a WIP but actually feels very close to a release candidate.

Developer Notes

The support is based on the same Yocto BSP v1.10 release used for Genivi 10 and there are no changes to the BSP components.
Changes were limited to adoptions to the krogoth (YP 2.1) branches used by the Genivi Yocto Baseline and of course meta-ivi 11.
Functionally the Poky meta implementation of libdrm is now used.

In summary there have been the following major changes:-

  • Support gtk+3 v3.18.8 used in YP 2.1
  • Support systemd v299 used in YP 2.1
  • Support gst 1.6.x used in YP 2.1 when h/w acceleration is disabled.
  • Support mesa 11.x used in YP 2.1. Update configuration (disable libgbm) to fix do_populate_sysroot() error
  • Fix omx-user-module QA issue in do_populate_sysroot() related to .la files
  • No longer use Renesas libdrm fork
  • Fix build error related to linux-libc-headers
  • Drop ncurses bbappend as functionality now upstream
  • Drop unused gcc 4.8 bbappend

For those who like a graphical diff compared to Genivi 10 you can find a Github compare here.

The following sections provide some more detail including a migration guide.

General information about building Genivi 11 Miranda for the Renesas R-Car SoCs, including build instructions for the Genivi Yocto Baseline and links to GDP can be found in the Renesas Genivi 11 page.

Migration Guide / Behavior changes

  • No changes to the BSP components.

 

See the Genivi 10 Migration Guide to be reminded of some functional improvements in the previous release.

Testing

The update has been successfully tested with Genivi Yocto Baseline 11 M-02 and the GDP Master RC-1 release for Genivi 11.

Pull request #44 is pending for GDP-11 RC-1 to align the GDP Master branch with this release. The GDP Maintainers tell me they are about to merge it.

Earlier in July GENIVI received configuration for the GENIVI Development platform to run on another popular development board. This time it was Qualcomm’s Dragon Board. This board uses the Qualcomm Snapdragon 400 processor and includes things like bluetooth and GPS and seems quite well suited to running automotive software. I'm including a screen shot below from GitHub showing how Changhyeok Bae and Tom Pollard spun the new board up. Since GENIVI uses build-from-source build tools, namely Yocto and Baserock, we're able quickly port GDP to new hardware as long as there is a fairly recent kernel available for the hardware. 

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We look forward to more silicon joining the stable and a warm welcome to the Dragon board!